E is for Exercise

E is for Exercise

Exercise is not only safe during a healthy pregnancy but can be the key to helping you have an easier labor!  It is always a good idea to check with your care provider to ensure that exercise is safe during your specific pregnancy.  Some rare conditions can make exercise dangerous during pregnancy, so if you think you may have risks associated with exercise, definitely make sure to check with your provider before exercising…

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B is for Braxton Hicks

B is for Braxton Hicks

Braxton Hicks contractions are intermittent uterine contractions that can start early on in pregnancy.  Some women never notice them, others notice them early on, and still others will not notice them until about half way through the pregnancy.  These contractions are named after Doctor John Braxton Hicks who first described them in 1872.  Braxton Hicks will likely occur more frequently the farther you progress in your pregnancy and, in your last few weeks, may even come regularly and painfully which can cause confusion with preterm labor.  Braxton Hicks at the end of your pregnancy can be very intense and frequent, but they aren’t pointless; these contractions can help efface (thin out) and possibly even dilate (open up) your cervix.  While some doctors may call this false labor, it is more aptly described as prelabor because it does actually have a purpose in preparing your cervix for labor…

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A is for Amniotic Fluid

A is for Amniotic Fluid

You hear a lot about amniotic fluid indicating labor, or breaking while in labor, but you don’t hear much about amniotic fluid during pregnancy, so let me tell you all about amniotic fluid during pregnancy.  Amniotic fluid is a slightly yellow, clear fluid that fills the amniotic sac within the first 12 days following conception, starting out mostly as water.  Your baby floats in the amniotic fluid throughout your pregnancy.  The amount of amniotic fluid varies during your pregnancy and typically reaches it max at 34 weeks…

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